VO₂max and vVO₂max, do they matter?

What’s your VO₂max? The questions that almost all runners hear at some point? The number that runners look and try to improve. But what does it really mean?

VO₂max is the maximum oxygen uptake capacity, it is described in ml/ kg/min. In practice, it means cardiovascular and circulatory systems ability to carry oxygen in the Continue reading ”VO₂max and vVO₂max, do they matter?”

Running cadence – does it matter?

Running cadence is how often your feet touch the ground during the running. According to the Jack Daniels’ study most of elite athlete takes over 180 step per minute (include both legs), some takes even over 200 steps. So, how many step are recommended to non-elite runners? Many studies and coaches says 180 steps, and I agree with this.

Why? The faster the speed more steps are needed for smooth and economical running. The less step are taken the more time is spent in the air, while landing to the ground is harder. Your lower body ligaments, joints, bones and muscles receive over three times your body weight each landing. Every time your foot land on the ground your muscles and tendons stretch to absorb energy from impact. Once they return the normal length Continue reading ”Running cadence – does it matter?”

Plyometric training for runners

What is plyometric training?
Plyometric training is often perceived as explosive jumping exercises, even if it means short, mostly of own body weight performed explosive interval style exercises. Training is based on the ”stretch-shortening cycle” method. Leg muscles is stored in a large number of human energy stocks, for example, when we jump we are able to take the energy for next jump from the previous ones impact, when landing on the ground. This makes it possible to jump even higher.

Why you should do it?
Quick conclusion is that this type of training must be good for sprinter, but Turner et al. (2003), actually found that it also help improve running economy for longer distance. It’s also prevent injuries as it’s strengthening ligaments and muscles. To have speed and specially able to maintain speed, runner need to train both speed and power. When these features are development not only running speed but also contact time on the ground accelerate. The less feet spent time on the ground while running the less human use energy.

Including plyometric exercise to your training plan
Before you start to do plyometric exercises, you should have a good base condition already. Do not do the exercises year-round. Do exercises on your speed and power development training cycle. It’s not good to do the exercises in the same week when you have running race.

Squat jumps, tuck jumps, lateral squat jump, lunge jumps, side hops, bounding, power skipping and diagonal obstacle jump are just a few examples of plyometric training. Before you start to do plyometric training, you have to warm up. You can do 10-20 repetitions, 10-20 times depending on your fitness level. If you are not familiar with these kinds of training start with lower reps and pay attention to your technique especially when landing on ground to avoid any injuries.

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